Tailoring System Architecture Development and Modeling

Tailoring System Architecture Development and Modeling

System architecture development is not a “one size fits all” process. Architecting and architecture modeling can range from an advising role on a small development program to a complex architecture model with extensive analysis for a large or complex development program. System architecting activities should be tailored to provide maximum return on investment to a program. Numerous studies have shown the value of system architecting to prevent costly rework and schedule slips in large or complex development programs. Some of these studies have further shown various factors affecting the optimum percentage of time to devote to architecting. The purpose of this study was to provide a framework for tailoring system architecture work to provide optimum value to a development program. This investigation approached the process of developing a system architecture model as if the model itself was a system. Good system engineering practices dictated we examine how the model is used and how the model adds value. Each aspect of architecture model development and use was explored to discover alternatives. For each alternative, factors were identified for evaluating potential benefits and costs of that alternative. A spectrum of system architecting effort was developed and criteria defined for determining where a development best fits in that spectrum. The results from this study provide a framework that can be used during architecture development planning to tailor the architecting effort to provide maximum value to the program or pursuit.

Speaker Bio

Steven Davies is an experienced systems engineer, system architect, and educator. He has been teaching systems architecture in the Master of Science in System Engineering program at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona since 2016. Prior to that he was Chief Engineer for a U.S. Navy GPS landing system development program recognized in 2012 by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems Engineering as one of the Top 5 Programs in systems engineering. He holds eight patents covering satellite anti-spoofing, high assurance computing, and digital signal processing hardware.